Lower socioeconomic factors are associated with higher mortality in patients with septic shock. Journal Article


Authors: Colon Hidalgo, D; Tapaskar, N; Rao, S; Masic, D; Su, A; Portillo, J; Rech, M
Article Title: Lower socioeconomic factors are associated with higher mortality in patients with septic shock.
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Previous studies have explored the relationship between socioeconomic status and sepsis outcomes OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if race, ethnicity, economic stability, neighborhood environment, and access to health care are predictive of mortality in patients with septic shock. METHODS: Retrospective study of septic shock patients admitted to two medical centers. RESULTS: Caucasian patients had higher proportion of outpatient physician visits in the year prior to admission and were less likely to be Medicare or Medicaid beneficiaries. Thirty-day mortality was lower for the Caucasian cohort (39.3% vs. 48.7%, p  0.01). Multivariate logistic regression found several predictors of 30-day mortality including Minority race/ethnicity (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.12-1.86), unemployment (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.09-1.81), and neighborhood poverty rate =10% (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.01-2.01). CONCLUSIONS: Minority patients, unemployed patients, and those living in neighborhoods with poverty rates greater than 10% suffered from higher 30-day mortality when admitted for septic shock.
Journal Title: Heart lung : the journal of critical care
ISSN: 1527-3288; 0147-9563
Publisher: Unknown  
Date Published: 2021
LUC Authors
  1. Megan Rech
    72 Rech
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