Racial differences in urinary incontinence prevalence, overactive bladder and associated bother among men: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Journal Article


Authors: Akbar, A; Liu, K; Michos, ED; Brubaker, L; Markossian, T; Bancks, MP; Kramer, H
Article Title: Racial differences in urinary incontinence prevalence, overactive bladder and associated bother among men: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Abstract: PURPOSE: To examine the association of race/ethnicity with urinary incontinence subtypes and overactive bladder and associated bother in older men. METHODS: This cross-sectional analysis utilized data from Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, an observational cohort of four racial/ethnic groups. At the sixth follow-up exam (age 60 to 98 years, 2015-16), urinary symptoms were ascertained with the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire. Prevalence ratios (PR) of urinary incontinence subtypes and overactive bladder without incontinence by race/ethnicity were calculated while adjusting for demographics, comorbidities and medications. Degree of bother was based on scale of 0 (none) to 10 (most) with bother presence defined as a score =3. RESULTS: Among 1536 men, 94% completed the questionnaire. Among completers, race/ethnicity was 40.7% Non-Hispanic White, 14.3% Chinese, 23.0% Non-Hispanic Black and 22.1% Hispanic. Urinary incontinence was reported by 11.1%, and urgency urinary incontinence accounted for 78.0% of all urinary incontinence. Highest prevalence of urgency urinary incontinence was noted among Non-Hispanic Black men (13.0%) followed by Hispanic (11.3%), Non-Hispanic White (6.8%) and Chinese (2.9%) men. NH Black men showed higher prevalence of any urinary incontinence (PR 1.62; 95% CI 1.06, 2.47) and urgency urinary incontinence (1.63; 1.01, 2.61) compared to NH White men after adjustments for covariates. No significant association was noted with other urinary incontinence subtypes by race/ethnicity after adjustment for covariates. Over 70% of urinary incontinence was associated with bother for all racial/ethnic groups. CONCLUSION: Urinary incontinence prevalence differs by race/ethnicity but most urinary incontinence is associated with bother regardless of race/ethnicity.
Journal Title: The Journal of urology
ISSN: 1527-3792; 0022-5347
Publisher: Elsevier Inc  
Date Published: 2020